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Our team has many skills so we’re able to offer a wide array of services. Far away, behind the word mountains, far from the countries Vokalia and Contia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Booksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean.

It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth. Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life.

The location

Significance of the monument

Explanation

During the Second World War, the majority of the Jewish population in The Hague was deported and murdered in concentration camps. Over 14,000 Jewish residents of The Hague were deported, and at least 12,000 of these were murdered. That makes The Hague the second city in the Netherlands when it comes to the number of Jewish residents who were deported and killed.

It is now over 70 years ago since the end of the Second World War and The Hague still did not have a fitting monument to remember and commemorate its Jewish residents. For that reason, the Jewish Monument The Hague Foundation took the initiative to create a monument in the heart of the old Jewish district in The Hague to remember and commemorate their fellow citizens. So that they are not forgotten.

On behalf of the foundation, artist Anat Ratzabi created a design for a meaningful monument. The monument has various elements and also integrates the existing Amalek monument on the Gedempte Gracht, creating a beautiful and historic monument at the heart of the old Jewish district. The Hague, and in particular the Jewish community, now has somewhere they can go to remember and commemorate their fellow citizens.

Jewish family

Jewish family

Monument church walling

Monument church walling

Plaque

Plaque

Photo: Ido Menco

Overview square

Overview square

Floor plan square

Floor plan square

Rabbijn Maarsen Square

Rabbijn Maarsen Square

Photo: Ido Menco

Sculpture detail Amalek 1

Sculpture detail Amalek 1

Sculpture detail Amalek 2

Sculpture detail Amalek 2

Plaque ‘Rachel weeps’

Plaque ‘Rachel weeps’

Amalek monument unveiling 1967

Amalek monument unveiling 1967

Levi Lassen

Levi Lassen

The Amalek monument used to be in the Gedempte Gracht in The Hague. It was created in 1967 by Dick Stins and unveiled again after a renovation in 2007. It is in the form of the Star of David. In the Star of David, there is a family seeking protection and at their feet is a picture of a victim of the Holocaust.

By the Star of David is a line from Devarim (Deuteronomy), one of the five books of the Torah, the Jewish name for the Old Testament.
‘Remember what Amalek did to you… don’t forget. (DEUT: 25.17.19)’
Underneath is the same text in Hebrew.

Symbolism
Amalek is the grandson of Esau, who with his people was the archenemy of the Israelites.

Unveiling
The creation of the memorial was an initiative of the Stichting Levi Lassen. The monument was unveiled on 12 October 1967 by Chief Rabbi S. Beëri.

Location
The memorial was attached to the wall of the Stichting Levi Lassen building on the Gedempte Gracht in The Hague.

Levi Lassen 1884 – 1962

Jacques Levi Lassen was born on February 25th 1884 in Bergen in Germany – as Jacob Levi. At the age of 15, he started work with the textile company Siegmund Strauss Jr. In 1904, this company sent him to the Netherlands to run a branch in The Hague. He decided to stay permanently in the Netherlands and in 1920 was given Dutch citizenship. In 1923, he obtained approval (by Royal Decree) to take the name Lassen. The company flourished and expanded until the start of the Second World War. Urged by his colleagues, J.L Lassen left The Hague and spent the war years in New York. In 1946, he resumed the running of the company. In memory of the former residents of the Jewish District, J.L. Lassen dedicated the last 16 years of his life to redeveloping this old district. On June 24th 1957, J.L. Lassen founded the Stichting Levi Lassen, of which he was the only director until his death (March 5th 1962) and to which he left his entire estate.

Detail monument

Detail monument

Photo: Ido Menco

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The Jewish Monument  Foundation wanted to install and maintain a suitable monument in memory of the Jews of The Hague who were murdered during the Second World War as well as the vibrant Jewish area that existed here for almost four centuries. This monument was designed for the population of The Hague, focusing on young people in general and the Jewish community in particular.
Plaque ‘Rachel weeps’

Plaque ‘Rachel weeps’